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Showing posts from July, 2018

The tipping point: Service sector employees are more susceptible to mental health issues

Service workers who rely on tips are at greater risk for depression, sleep problems and stress compared with employees who work in non-tipped positions. Strongest impact is to women who comprise 56 percent of all service workers.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2OuKjPL

Single-cell RNA profiling

A team has improved both the sensitivity and efficiency of a popular method for single-cell RNA sequencing, which yields a molecular fingerprint for individual cells based on their patterns of gene activity.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2OsXLDM

New cell lines produce monoclonal antibody for improved biologic drugs

NISTmAb, the world's first standardized monoclonal antibody has become a valuable tool for biomanufacturers developing new biologic therapies for cancers, autoimmune disorders and infectious diseases. Although the molecule has been precisely characterized, the current proprietary method for its production has not. In a new article, researchers describe how they have taken the first step to solve this dilemma: engineering three mouse cell lines to produce nonproprietary versions of NISTmAb that closely resemble the characteristics of the original reference material.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2mYipz7

How Rudy Giuliani's freewheeling media strategy could hurt Trump

Analysis: The president's attorney is taking some risks by disregarding some basic safety rules for defense attorneys when talking to the media.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2vliLDV

Democrats call on Trump to halt public release of plastic gun instructions

An Austin, Texas man had announced plans to release a blueprint this week that contains instructions on how to build the weapons using a 3D printer.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2O1nYsf

Mapping of magnetic particles in the human brain

Researchers have for the first time mapped the distribution of magnetic particles in the human brain. The study reveals that the particles are primarily located in the cerebellum and the brainstem, which are the more ancient parts of the brain.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2LF0Ym0

Spatz 10-Step System: A national model for breastfeeding

Mothers of critically ill infants may not receive necessary breastfeeding support, because their babies may be taken directly to a newborn intensive care unit or to surgery. A lactation expert now presents a model for healthcare providers to serve the needs of these vulnerable babies.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2NYh9HO

The tipping point: Service sector employees are more susceptible to mental health issues

Service workers who rely on tips are at greater risk for depression, sleep problems and stress compared with employees who work in non-tipped positions. Strongest impact is to women who comprise 56 percent of all service workers.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2OuKjPL

Single-cell RNA profiling

A team has improved both the sensitivity and efficiency of a popular method for single-cell RNA sequencing, which yields a molecular fingerprint for individual cells based on their patterns of gene activity.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2OsXLDM

Turning off protein could boost immunotherapy effectiveness on cancer tumors

Researchers have discovered that inhibiting a previously known protein could reduce tumor burdens and enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatments.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2n11D2s

Past experiences shape what we see more than what we are looking at now

A new study argues that humans recognize what they are looking at by combining current sensory stimuli with comparisons to images stored in memory.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2AszB9r

New cell lines produce monoclonal antibody for improved biologic drugs

NISTmAb, the world's first standardized monoclonal antibody has become a valuable tool for biomanufacturers developing new biologic therapies for cancers, autoimmune disorders and infectious diseases. Although the molecule has been precisely characterized, the current proprietary method for its production has not. In a new article, researchers describe how they have taken the first step to solve this dilemma: engineering three mouse cell lines to produce nonproprietary versions of NISTmAb that closely resemble the characteristics of the original reference material.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2mYipz7

Scientists discover potential therapy for human copper metabolism disorders

Individuals with defects in copper metabolism may soon have more targeted treatment options thanks to a new discovery. A new report that an investigational anticancer-drug, elesclomol, can restore the production of cytochrome oxidase protein complex, a critical copper-dependent enzyme required for mitochondrial energy production.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2v59Kzs

Smart phone use: Distracted pedestrians walk slower and are less steady on their feet

Engineers have analyzed just how mobile device use affects pedestrians, and their findings could help develop safer roads and autonomous cars in the future.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2M6RVXd

Turning off protein could boost immunotherapy effectiveness on cancer tumors

Researchers have discovered that inhibiting a previously known protein could reduce tumor burdens and enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatments.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2n11D2s

Past experiences shape what we see more than what we are looking at now

A new study argues that humans recognize what they are looking at by combining current sensory stimuli with comparisons to images stored in memory.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2AszB9r

Trump's DHS chief: 'Let me be clear. It was the Russians.'

Kirstjen Nielsen said Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. elections was "directed from the highest levels."

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2Ka6k37

Facebook says covert campaign spread divisive political messages

Facebook said on Tuesday it had uncovered a new, covert campaign to spread divisive political messages on its social network.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2LIlYbF

Man shot dead by police who confused him for burglar he just killed

"This is a very heartbreaking and tragic situation for everyone involved," Aurora Police Department Chief Nick Metz said in a statement.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2vo9meC

Scientists discover potential therapy for human copper metabolism disorders

Individuals with defects in copper metabolism may soon have more targeted treatment options thanks to a new discovery. A new report that an investigational anticancer-drug, elesclomol, can restore the production of cytochrome oxidase protein complex, a critical copper-dependent enzyme required for mitochondrial energy production.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2v59Kzs

Film diversity report says Hollywood rhetoric hasn't equaled results

The percentage of female characters with speaking parts in the top 100 films has remained largely unchanged at or around 30 percent over the past decade.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2Kfy6v3

Depressed teens turn to social media to cope, survey finds

Despite fears that digital tech may worsen depression, most teens and young adults surveyed said it did not make a difference.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2OtUWT0

How Meghan Markle's influence is helping fight menstruation taboos

Many menstruating women are barred from entering temples and touching food or other human beings. Some spend their periods in huts outside their homes.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2AsP5ug

Soccer heading may be riskier for female players

Researchers have found that women who play soccer may be more at risk than their male counterparts. According to a new study, female soccer players exhibit more extensive changes to brain tissue after repetitive 'heading' of the soccer ball.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2LKIikb

Real-time foot-and-mouth strategy to better fight disease

Future outbreaks of foot-and-mouth (FMD) disease can be combatted quickly and efficiently from early on -- when authorities have minimal information -- thanks to a new real-time strategy.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2v9VoOr

Use of VA services impacted by external economic, policy changes

A new study has found that use of VA services is affected by economic and policy changes outside the VA, such as Medicaid eligibility, private employer insurance coverage, unemployment and (non-VA) physician availability.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2NUS40i

Acidic pH: The weakness of cancer cells

A new computational model has allowed researchers to identify new therapeutic targets that can attack cancer cells by lowering their intracellular pH.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2OxdSQY

Gene therapy: Better adenine base editing system

Scientists have developed and improved the ABE system in mouse and rat strains, which has great implications for human genetic disorders and gene therapy.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2mVtIZ0

Acidic pH: The weakness of cancer cells

A new computational model has allowed researchers to identify new therapeutic targets that can attack cancer cells by lowering their intracellular pH.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2OxdSQY

Gene therapy: Better adenine base editing system

Scientists have developed and improved the ABE system in mouse and rat strains, which has great implications for human genetic disorders and gene therapy.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2mVtIZ0

Soccer heading may be riskier for female players

Researchers have found that women who play soccer may be more at risk than their male counterparts. According to a new study, female soccer players exhibit more extensive changes to brain tissue after repetitive 'heading' of the soccer ball.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2LKIikb

Real-time foot-and-mouth strategy to better fight disease

Future outbreaks of foot-and-mouth (FMD) disease can be combatted quickly and efficiently from early on -- when authorities have minimal information -- thanks to a new real-time strategy.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2v9VoOr

Use of VA services impacted by external economic, policy changes

A new study has found that use of VA services is affected by economic and policy changes outside the VA, such as Medicaid eligibility, private employer insurance coverage, unemployment and (non-VA) physician availability.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2NUS40i

LeBron James: Trump is 'dividing us' through sports

LeBron James says President Donald Trump is "dividing us" through sports and that he'd "never sit across from him."

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2v1TdfM

GOP candidates hug Trump. But is that the best strategy for November?

First Read is your briefing from "Meet the Press" and the NBC Political Unit on the day's most important political stories and why they matter.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2v4gkGx

Wildfires rip through California towns

Firefighters from across the U.S are being sent to California to help crews stretched to the limit as they battle 17 wildfires.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2NZTPJA

Colbert calls for boss Les Moonves to be held accountable amid allegations

"Make no mistake, Les Moonves is my guy," Colbert said. " ... but accountability is meaningless unless it's for everybody."

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2n1sGKN

Mom says paramedics asked whether daughter could afford $600 bill

"My daughter ... screamed and begged them to take her to the hospital," mom Nicole Black said.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2Kd3z0I

Exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields at work not associated with brain tumors

No clear associations were found between occupational exposure to high frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) and risk of glioma or meningioma, in one of the largest epidemiological studies performed to date and led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa' Foundation. However, the findings highlight the need for further research on radiofrequency magnetic fields and tumor promotion, as well as possible interactions with other frequencies and with chemicals.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2mXNlj2

Research into cell-to-cell signalling mechanism may lead to new cancer treatments

Pioneering new research into the way in which cells communicate with each other could hold the key to unlocking new, improved treatment for life-threatening diseases, including cancer.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2Ao5bW1

Echoing Giuliani's defense, Trump now says 'collusion is not a crime'

For months, Trump had repeated there was "no collusion" between his campaign and Russia. Now, he and his lawyers are saying collusion isn't illegal.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2v4kPRr

49ers star Richard Sherman calls Cowboys' anthem policy 'the old plantation mentality'

Jones said last week that the Cowboys would require players to stand for the national anthem. The NFL since has since said it's negotiating a new policy.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2uXI2EL

Exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields at work not associated with brain tumors

No clear associations were found between occupational exposure to high frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) and risk of glioma or meningioma, in one of the largest epidemiological studies performed to date and led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa' Foundation. However, the findings highlight the need for further research on radiofrequency magnetic fields and tumor promotion, as well as possible interactions with other frequencies and with chemicals.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2mXNlj2

Research into cell-to-cell signalling mechanism may lead to new cancer treatments

Pioneering new research into the way in which cells communicate with each other could hold the key to unlocking new, improved treatment for life-threatening diseases, including cancer.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2Ao5bW1

Heat therapy boosts mitochondrial function in muscles

A new study finds that long-term heat therapy may increase mitochondrial function in the muscles. The discovery could lead to new treatments for people with chronic illness or disease.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2AyrYP8

Heat therapy boosts mitochondrial function in muscles

A new study finds that long-term heat therapy may increase mitochondrial function in the muscles. The discovery could lead to new treatments for people with chronic illness or disease.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2AyrYP8

Trump slams Koch network as 'overrated' and a 'total joke'

The tweets come after top leaders at the conservative donor network spoke out against the direction of the GOP.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2v0Vd80

Kentucky governor calls California's Newsom a 'dirtbag'

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, a Republican, had choice words for Democratic California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom during a private panel discussion at a Koch network meeting.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2Kem70C

At Koch meeting, Cornyn opens up on GOP's Supreme Court strategy

The Senate Majority Whip said at a closed-door session that the prospect of the Senate voting on Brett Kavanaugh's nomination close to Election Day 'scares the living daylights out of' Democrats

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2LLUAsm

MH370 lapses prompt Malaysia civil aviation boss' resignation

It was during a routine handover by controllers that the Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 vanished in 2014.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2M2337O

World's longest aircraft looks like a 'flying bum' but will have a posh interior

The Airlander 10 is designed to let wealthy travelers cruise the sky.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2AsddNF

'What about me,' ask migrant children, parents who are still separated

"He asks, 'What about me,'" a man says of his younger brother who still waits in a shelter while other children have left to be reunited with parents.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2LBcWx3

Former Trump campaign chair Manafort is first to face trial in Russia probe

Jury selection begins Tuesday in the federal court trial of Paul Manafort, though the charges do not involve his time with Trump.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2Ka7n37

California wildfires kill 8, burn a quarter-million acres

"Everything is extremely dry. It's like the perfect recipe for a major fire," a fire official said.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2mYWvvI

States seek to block instructions for making plastic guns

The guns, which fire conventional bullets, could never be traced if used in a crime, because there's no serial number.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2LFCvx1

Did cruise ship guards have to kill polar bear? Experts say maybe

The guards who shot and killed a polar bear on the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard likely used other methods to try and deescalate the situation before shooting the animal.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2KaLxwr

Obama and Biden reunite at Washington bakery that supports veterans

The pair, whose close-knit relationship during their White House tenure sparked numerous internet memes, praised the bakery for their work before leaving.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2LFCAkj

Judge orders many migrant kids removed from Texas facility

A lawsuit alleged that children held at the Texas facility are likely to be administered psychotropic drugs without their parents' consent.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2OutggI

Koch organization won't support GOP Senate candidate Cramer

The move in a key Senate race comes as the Koch network is seeking distance from President Trump's GOP.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2KbUPrR

Conspiracy theorists hijack YouTube results for A-listers

The video portal has been repeatedly criticized for not curtailing videos of conspiracy theories and false information on its platform.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2mUjM1E

'Bigfoot erotica'? Virginia Democrat says GOP opponent is a fan

A candidate's fascination with Bigfoot is becoming an unlikely issue in a competitive congressional race.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2Ka4zTD

Fact check: What Trump got wrong in his attacks on Mueller

The president's tweetstorm on Sunday contained a number of factual inaccuracies and misstatements.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2LFChpF

Thieves steal San Antonio Aquarium shark in a baby carriage

The sharknappers brought their own net, snagged the shark from a tide pool exhibit and escaped in a red pickup truck.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2AsLZXa

Half of Americans shop online when drunk — but gin lovers overspend the most

The average American buys $447.57 worth of stuff while drunk — more than double what people said they spent on drunk purchases last year.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2mYzNnu

Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani says collusion with Russia is not a crime

Giuliani, speaking to several media outlets, also attacked Michael Cohen, the president's former personal attorney.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2LAQMed

Going to Mars will involve all sorts of risks. Going bonkers might be the biggest

NASA has a plan to help spaceflyers cope with profound isolation during the two-year round trip.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2LFC5Xt

A NASA scientist is behind bars in Turkey. But Trump isn't tweeting about it.

American citizen Serkan Golge is behind bars on charges U.S. says are "without credible evidence." But pastor Andrew Brunson has the president's attention.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2KbhZi1

Facial recognition would let police track our every move. Are we ready?

"It's not too late for someone to take a stand and keep this from happening," said the CEO of a facial recognition company.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2KbaV55

Routine genomic screening could find risks for cancer and heart disease in 3 to 4 million

Unbeknownst to them, at least 1 percent of the US population has an identifiable genetic risk for cancer or heart disease that could be detected and clinically managed through genomic screening. Researchers say that identifying those 3 to 4 million persons and effectively mitigating that risk are worthy goals, but more work is needed before genomic screening becomes routine in health care.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2LAVHvH

DNA repair after CRISPR cutting not at all what people thought

Scientists discovered that a well-known DNA repair pathway, the Fanconi anemia pathway, surprisingly plays a key role in repairing double-strand DNA breaks created by CRISPR-Cas9. It acts as a traffic cop to steer repair to simple end-joining or to patching the cut with new, single-strand DNA. Scientists could potentially tweak proteins involved in the pathway to preferentially steer the outcome toward replacement with DNA, which is important for gene therapy for hereditary diseases.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2LzObkE

Lack of a single molecule may indicate severe and treatment-resistant depression

Researchers find that a deficiency of acetyl-L-carnitine is associated with a particular subtype of depression. Individuals with very low levels of this molecule often have highly severe symptoms and don't respond to traditional antidepressants.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2OvL4bA

Harnessing hair loss gene could improve cancer immunotherapy

Researchers at Columbia found that a gene associated with an autoimmune form of hair loss may be activated to boost cancer immunotherapy.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2LMm15q

Sequencing a malaria mosquito's motherline

A team led by scientists from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has sequenced and annotated the first complete mitochondrial genome of Anopheles funestus, one of the main vectors of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2NXxr3K

How Oropouche virus replicates in human cells

Results point to potential targets worth exploring in effort to halt infection by the emerging virus, which is transmitted by the C. paraensis midge. Oropouche's strategy of 'hijacking' the Golgi complex in order to replicate itself has never been described before, state the researchers.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2M6IoQ5

Potent antibodies against three Ebola viruses

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and their colleagues are a step closer to developing a broadly effective antibody treatment against the three major Ebola viruses that cause lethal disease in humans.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2AvnW9Q

Microfluidic system incorporates neuroinflammation into 'Alzheimer's in a dish' model

Building on their development of the first culture system to replicate fully the pathology behind Alzheimer's disease, a research team has now produced a system that includes neuroinflammation, the key biological response that leads to the death of brain cells.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2K9BnMm

Diet matters less than evolutionary relationships in shaping gut microbiome

In the largest published comparative dataset of non-human primate gut microbiomes to date, a new study set out to find whether leaf-eating primates have similar gut microbes that help them break down their leafy diet, which is full of fiber and toxins.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2LQ2yAS

Poor mental health days may cost the economy billions of dollars

Poor mental health may cost businesses nearly as much as physical health problems, according to researchers. A single extra poor mental health day in a month was associated with a 1.84 percent drop in the per capita real income growth rate, resulting in $53 billion less total income each year.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2ApwKhF

Discuss religion, spirituality when treating young adults with severe mental illness

A majority of young adults with severe mental illness -- bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or major depression -- consider religion and spirituality relevant to their mental health, according to a new study.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2OunH1V

Inflammation inhibitor delivered directly to kidneys reverses course of destructive nephritis

Using a humanmade version of a human antibody to directly deliver a drug that inhibits a powerful driver of inflammation, can reverse a disease course that often leads to kidney failure and dialysis, investigators report.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2Apqeav

Nano-optic endoscope sees deep into tissue at high resolution

Experts in endoscopic imaging and pioneers of flat metalens technology have teamed up to develop a new class of endoscopic imaging catheters -- termed nano-optic endoscopes -- that overcome the limitations of current systems.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2M6VJYE

Peste des petits ruminants: A model for use in eradicating the disease

After rinderpest, it is peste des petits ruminants that the OIE, FAO and European Union want to eradicate by 2030. This highly contagious disease is currently found in Africa, Asia and the Middle East, and was recently detected in Bulgarie , on the border with Turkey. A new article suggests a model that serves to prioritize zones for vaccination. This is a welcome alternative to mass vaccination campaigns, which are both costly and highly complex to implement.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2mX0n0e

Routine genomic screening could find risks for cancer and heart disease in 3 to 4 million

Unbeknownst to them, at least 1 percent of the US population has an identifiable genetic risk for cancer or heart disease that could be detected and clinically managed through genomic screening. Researchers say that identifying those 3 to 4 million persons and effectively mitigating that risk are worthy goals, but more work is needed before genomic screening becomes routine in health care.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2LAVHvH

DNA repair after CRISPR cutting not at all what people thought

Scientists discovered that a well-known DNA repair pathway, the Fanconi anemia pathway, surprisingly plays a key role in repairing double-strand DNA breaks created by CRISPR-Cas9. It acts as a traffic cop to steer repair to simple end-joining or to patching the cut with new, single-strand DNA. Scientists could potentially tweak proteins involved in the pathway to preferentially steer the outcome toward replacement with DNA, which is important for gene therapy for hereditary diseases.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2LzObkE

Lack of a single molecule may indicate severe and treatment-resistant depression

Researchers find that a deficiency of acetyl-L-carnitine is associated with a particular subtype of depression. Individuals with very low levels of this molecule often have highly severe symptoms and don't respond to traditional antidepressants.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2OvL4bA

Harnessing hair loss gene could improve cancer immunotherapy

Researchers at Columbia found that a gene associated with an autoimmune form of hair loss may be activated to boost cancer immunotherapy.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2LMm15q

Sequencing a malaria mosquito's motherline

A team led by scientists from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has sequenced and annotated the first complete mitochondrial genome of Anopheles funestus, one of the main vectors of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2NXxr3K

How Oropouche virus replicates in human cells

Results point to potential targets worth exploring in effort to halt infection by the emerging virus, which is transmitted by the C. paraensis midge. Oropouche's strategy of 'hijacking' the Golgi complex in order to replicate itself has never been described before, state the researchers.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2M6IoQ5

Potent antibodies against three Ebola viruses

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and their colleagues are a step closer to developing a broadly effective antibody treatment against the three major Ebola viruses that cause lethal disease in humans.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2AvnW9Q

Microfluidic system incorporates neuroinflammation into 'Alzheimer's in a dish' model

Building on their development of the first culture system to replicate fully the pathology behind Alzheimer's disease, a research team has now produced a system that includes neuroinflammation, the key biological response that leads to the death of brain cells.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2K9BnMm

Diet matters less than evolutionary relationships in shaping gut microbiome

In the largest published comparative dataset of non-human primate gut microbiomes to date, a new study set out to find whether leaf-eating primates have similar gut microbes that help them break down their leafy diet, which is full of fiber and toxins.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2LQ2yAS

Poor mental health days may cost the economy billions of dollars

Poor mental health may cost businesses nearly as much as physical health problems, according to researchers. A single extra poor mental health day in a month was associated with a 1.84 percent drop in the per capita real income growth rate, resulting in $53 billion less total income each year.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2ApwKhF

Discuss religion, spirituality when treating young adults with severe mental illness

A majority of young adults with severe mental illness -- bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or major depression -- consider religion and spirituality relevant to their mental health, according to a new study.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2OunH1V

Inflammation inhibitor delivered directly to kidneys reverses course of destructive nephritis

Using a humanmade version of a human antibody to directly deliver a drug that inhibits a powerful driver of inflammation, can reverse a disease course that often leads to kidney failure and dialysis, investigators report.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2Apqeav

Nano-optic endoscope sees deep into tissue at high resolution

Experts in endoscopic imaging and pioneers of flat metalens technology have teamed up to develop a new class of endoscopic imaging catheters -- termed nano-optic endoscopes -- that overcome the limitations of current systems.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2M6VJYE

Peste des petits ruminants: A model for use in eradicating the disease

After rinderpest, it is peste des petits ruminants that the OIE, FAO and European Union want to eradicate by 2030. This highly contagious disease is currently found in Africa, Asia and the Middle East, and was recently detected in Bulgarie , on the border with Turkey. A new article suggests a model that serves to prioritize zones for vaccination. This is a welcome alternative to mass vaccination campaigns, which are both costly and highly complex to implement.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2mX0n0e

Video recordings spotlight poor communication between nurses and doctors

Communication breakdown among nurses and doctors is one of the primary reasons for patient care mistakes in the hospital.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2NWaWvP

Nano-sized traps show promise in diagnosing pathogenic bacterial infections

A new type of 'lab on a chip' has the potential to become a clinical tool capable of detecting very small quantities of disease-causing bacteria in just minutes.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2v3Bfct

Video recordings spotlight poor communication between nurses and doctors

Communication breakdown among nurses and doctors is one of the primary reasons for patient care mistakes in the hospital.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2NWaWvP

Nano-sized traps show promise in diagnosing pathogenic bacterial infections

A new type of 'lab on a chip' has the potential to become a clinical tool capable of detecting very small quantities of disease-causing bacteria in just minutes.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2v3Bfct

E-cigarettes and tobacco product use linked to increased risk of oral cancer

New research shows that most non-cigarette tobacco users are exposed to carcinogen levels comparable to or exceeding exposure among exclusive cigarette smokers -- levels that are likely to place users at substantial risk.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2NSITNU

Mutation 'hotspots' in DNA: Research could lead to new insights on cancer risks

New research has identified 'hotspots' in DNA where the risk for genetic mutations from transcription errors is significantly elevated. Understanding how these errors occur is important since DNA errors play a large role in many types of cancer.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2OtFztG

E-cigarettes and tobacco product use linked to increased risk of oral cancer

New research shows that most non-cigarette tobacco users are exposed to carcinogen levels comparable to or exceeding exposure among exclusive cigarette smokers -- levels that are likely to place users at substantial risk.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2NSITNU

Smaller plates don't help you eat less when you're hungry, research finds

A new study debunks a popular diet trick based on the Delbouef illusion that predicts people will identify sizes differently when they are placed within a larger or smaller object. The classic experiment shows that people perceive a similar black circle is smaller when it embedded in a larger circle than when it is embedded in a smaller one.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2K996FU

Fact check: What Trump got wrong in his attacks on Mueller

The president's tweetstorm on Sunday contained a number of factual inaccuracies and misstatements.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2LQA6yA

FDA issues warning about 'intimate health' products

The agency says it has seen complaints about burns and other damage from the unapproved procedures.

from NBC News Top Stories https://ift.tt/2NXUmfb

Mutation 'hotspots' in DNA: Research could lead to new insights on cancer risks

New research has identified 'hotspots' in DNA where the risk for genetic mutations from transcription errors is significantly elevated. Understanding how these errors occur is important since DNA errors play a large role in many types of cancer.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2OtFztG

Magnetic nanoparticles deliver chemotherapy to difficult-to-reach spinal tumors

Researchers have demonstrated that magnetic nanoparticles can be used to ferry chemotherapy drugs into the spinal cord to treat hard-to-reach spinal tumors in an animal model. The unique delivery system represents a novel way to target chemotherapy drugs to spinal cancer cells, which are hard to reach because the drugs must cross the blood-brain barrier.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2K962Jz

Whales use song as sonar, psychologist proposes

A psychologist has proposed that humpback whales may use song for long-range sonar. It's the singing whale, not the listening whale who is doing most of the analysis. If correct, the model should change the direction of how we study whales.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2AqAtvi

Smaller plates don't help you eat less when you're hungry, research finds

A new study debunks a popular diet trick based on the Delbouef illusion that predicts people will identify sizes differently when they are placed within a larger or smaller object. The classic experiment shows that people perceive a similar black circle is smaller when it embedded in a larger circle than when it is embedded in a smaller one.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2K996FU

Preventing dangerous episodes of low blood sugar with diabetes: Study provides next clue

A new study reveals that a novel biomarker might give us new answers necessary to creating a diagnostic tool for hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure, or HAAF. No objective diagnostic tool currently exists for this condition which, if left untreated, can lead to ever-worsening and possibly life-threatening episodes of dangerously low blood sugar.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2K9RqcX

Magnetic nanoparticles deliver chemotherapy to difficult-to-reach spinal tumors

Researchers have demonstrated that magnetic nanoparticles can be used to ferry chemotherapy drugs into the spinal cord to treat hard-to-reach spinal tumors in an animal model. The unique delivery system represents a novel way to target chemotherapy drugs to spinal cancer cells, which are hard to reach because the drugs must cross the blood-brain barrier.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2K962Jz

Low-power devices may one day run on new heat-based power source

A new way to generate electricity in special materials called Weyl magnets has been discovered by physicists. The method exploits temperature gradients, differences in temperature throughout a material. This could pave the way for maintenance-free remote sensing devices or even medical implants.

from Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2mT5bDL

Preventing dangerous episodes of low blood sugar with diabetes: Study provides next clue

A new study reveals that a novel biomarker might give us new answers necessary to creating a diagnostic tool for hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure, or HAAF. No objective diagnostic tool currently exists for this condition which, if left untreated, can lead to ever-worsening and possibly life-threatening episodes of dangerously low blood sugar.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2K9RqcX

Low-power devices may one day run on new heat-based power source

A new way to generate electricity in special materials called Weyl magnets has been discovered by physicists. The method exploits temperature gradients, differences in temperature throughout a material. This could pave the way for maintenance-free remote sensing devices or even medical implants.

from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily https://ift.tt/2mT5bDL

Advancing the search for antibodies to treat Alzheimer's disease